En français: Les ponts de Paris, selon Gautier, Roubaud, et Apollinaire

Two Septembers ago, I began studying the French language, eventually reaching proficiency. I self studied two more semesters' worth of French grammar over the summer so that I could take a literature course when I returned in the fall. The first essay I ever wrote there was filled with grammatical errors, but made sense. The … Continue reading En français: Les ponts de Paris, selon Gautier, Roubaud, et Apollinaire

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Misconceptions: “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost

I love poems that talk about roads. It's such a wonderful metaphor for the choices we make in life, and a comparison of the journey we travel through time. And that's exactly what this is - I agree with that. What the meaning of the choice here is - that is where I differ in the common interpretation. In the first stanza, the narrator stands there at the fork making his decision. He can't take both roads and remain one person. He must choose one, though he does not know what it leads to, looking as far down "to where it bent" as possible. And to continue the metaphor, that is what our choices mean every day too. We can't both keep our job and quit it for another one, or go to both UC Berkeley and Rice University at once.