Passive female figures in Chekhov’s “The Darling”, “Anyuta”, and “A Gentleman Friend”

Known for his ability to recreate Russian life succinctly through representative anecdotes, Anton Chekhov creates female protagonists who uphold morals and expose flaws of Russian society through silent suffering and endurance. Due to their honesty and innocent malleability, these females are wronged and exploited as marginalized members of society. Olenka, Anyuta, and Vanda, from “The … Continue reading Passive female figures in Chekhov’s “The Darling”, “Anyuta”, and “A Gentleman Friend”

Advertisements

Some Universal Laws, According to Homer’s “Odyssey”

Recently I read the great Homerian epic, The Odyssey, and though I expected it to be difficult, the story was both grand and sensitive at times, and altogether very engaging. Simultaneously, I am also taking a Coursera class aptly titled Greek and Roman Mythology from the University of Pennsylvania (for free!). I've been working ahead a little bit and … Continue reading Some Universal Laws, According to Homer’s “Odyssey”

Humans Cry: The Strength in Vulnerability

To be human is to feel. Why is society okay with so many emotions, but not those that leave us vulnerable? It's okay to argue, shout, get angry, get passionate, become bored, show annoyance, to laugh, to be tired, to show love, or feel amazement, but it's not okay to grieve, to feel hurt, or scared, to be sad or lonely. We would sooner go up to someone and talk about our achievements with pride than burden them with our sadness.